Altitude Safety 101: Oxygen Levels

 

Use the tables below to see how the effective amount of oxygen in the air varies at different altitudes. Although air contains 20.9% oxygen at all altitudes, lower air pressure at high altitude makes it feel like there is a lower percentage of oxygen. The chart assumes a constant atmospheric temperature of 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 Celsius), and normal 1 atmosphere pressure at sea level.

 

Altitude (feet) Altitude (meters) Effective Oxygen % Altitude Category Example
0 ft 0 m 20.9 % Low Boston, MA
1,000 ft 305 m 20.1 % Low  
2,000 ft 610 m 19.4 % Low  
3,000 ft 914 m 18.6 % Medium  
4,000 ft 1,219 m 17.9 % Medium  
5,000 ft 1,524 m 17.3 % Medium Boulder, CO
6,000 ft 1,829 m 16.6 % Medium Mt. Washington
7,000 ft 2,134 m 16.0 % Medium  
8,000 ft 2,438 m 15.4 % High Aspen, CO
9,000 ft 2,743 m 14.8 % High  
10,000 ft 3,048 m 14.3 % High  
11,000 ft 3,353 m 13.7 % High Mt. Phillips
12,000 ft 3,658 m 13.2 % High Mt. Baldy
13,000 ft 3,962 m 12.7 % Very High  
14,000 ft 4,267 m 12.3 % Very High Pikes Peak
15,000 ft 4,572 m 11.8 % Very High  
16,000 ft 4,877 m 11.4 % Very High Mont Blanc
17,000 ft 5,182 m 11.0 % Very High  
18,000 ft 5,486 m 10.5 % Extreme  
19,000 ft 5,791 m 10.1 % Extreme Kilimanjaro
20,000 ft 6,096 m 9.7 % Extreme Denali
21,000 ft 6,401 m 9.4 % Extreme  
22,000 ft 6,706 m 9.0 % Extreme  
23,000 ft 7,010 m 8.7 % Extreme Aconcagua
24,000 ft 7,315 m 8.4 % Extreme  
25,000 ft 7,620 m 8.1 % Extreme  
26,000 ft 7,925 m 7.8 % Ultra  
27,000 ft 8,230 m 7.5 % Ultra  
28,000 ft 8,534 m 7.2 % Ultra K2
29,000 ft 8,839 m 6.9 % Ultra Everest

 

This program has not yet received any ratings.